Resources: #Linguistic #Typology, Experimental #Linguistics, and #Psycholinguistics

I am currently teaching a course on Linguistic Typology and thought I would share my list of introductory readings and resources with you. As an experimental linguist and language acquisition researcher with a cross-linguistic approach to psycholinguistics, I find that typological issues keep coming up in my projects. For instance, we needed those resources when we looked at

Introductions to Typology

Bisang, W. (2001). Aspects of typology and universals. Berlin: Akademie Verlag.

Christiansen, M. H., Collins, C., & Edelman, S. (2009). Language universals. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Comrie, B. (1989). Language universals and linguistic typology: Syntax and morphology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Croft, W. (2009). Typology and Universals. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Cysouw, M. (2005). Quantitative methods in typology. In G. Altman, R. Köhler, & R. Piotrowski (eds). Quantitative linguistics: an international handbook (pp. 554-578). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter

Givón, T. (1984/91). Syntax. A Functional-Typological Introduction. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Greenberg, J.H. (1974). Language typology: A historical and analytic overview. The Hague: Mouton de Gruyter.

Greenberg, J.H., et al. (eds.) (1978). Universals of Human Language. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Hickey, R. (eds.) (2017). The Cambridge Handbook of Areal Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lyovin, A.V. (1997). An introduction to the languages of the world. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Mallinson, G. & Blake, B.J. (1981). Language typology: Cross-linguistic studies in syntax. Amsterdam: North-Holland.

Nichols, J. (2007). What, if anything, is typology? Linguistic Typology, 11: 231–238.

Nichols, J. (1992). Linguistic diversity in space and time. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Plank, F. (ed.) (1986). Typology. The Hague: Mouton de Gruyter.

Shibatani, M. & Bynon, T. (eds.) (1995). Approaches to language typology. Oxford, UK: Clarendon.

Shopen, T. (ed.) (1985). Language Typology and Syntactic Description. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Slobin, D. I. (1997). The universal, the typological, and the particular in acquisition. In Dan I. Slobin (ed.), The Crosslinguistic Study of Language Acquisition, vol. 5: Expanding the Contexts (p.1-39). Mahwah, N.J.: Erlbaum.

Song, J. (2013). The Oxford handbook of linguistic typology: Morphology and syntax. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Song, J. (2014). Linguistic typology: Morphology and syntax. London: Routledge.

Velupillai, V. (2012). An introduction to linguistic typology. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing.

Whaley, L.J. (1997). Introduction to typology: The unity and diversity of language. Newbury Park: Sage.

Journals

Databases and other Resources

The Association for Linguistic Typology  has a list of databases and other resources for typological research. The Glottolog database of languages and language families also provides useful resources.

I hope you find these resources and the other resources on our ExperimentalFieldLinguistics website useful. I would greatly appreciate any further suggestions for this list and the resource lists on my sites for child-directed speech or language games.

Sonja

P.S. I have moved to Cologne now and I am currently teaching at the University of Cologne and working on my language games, trying to make them “greener” with a sustainable permaculture approach that should work well in fieldwork situations.

Sustainable Digital and Social Practices | experimentalfieldlinguistics.wordpress.com

Sustainable Digital and Social Practices

 

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